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Valves for military use

Phones- Digital, Analogue, PABX, Receivers, transmitters & military equipment.
 

Valves for military use

Post by Radiomobile » Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:44 pm

Watching a scene from Das Boot where the U-boot is under a depth charge attack I was wondering if the valves they used in the radio gear were specially designed to withstand extreme vibration?

I guess the same thing would apply when the main armament on a warship is being fired or many other military situations when the equipment is subjected to massive acceleration.

 
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Re: Valves for military use

Post by Andrewausfa » Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:23 pm

Funnily enough at a wedding last month I was talking to a chap who was a radio op on HMS something or other (HMS Compass Rose? Marlborough?). He mentioned this as they were in action off Korea and said all they had holding the valves were the spring retainers we sometimes see in our domestic sets. He couldn't recall the names of the sets he used. He was amazed I was interested in valve sets at all.

I'm not familiar with the innards of German U-Boote sets to know how they retained their valves but there should be plenty of photos on the interweb, try searching for Telefunken Koln E52 or Telefunken T9 K39.

Andrew

 

Re: Valves for military use

Post by Radiomobile » Mon Oct 15, 2012 8:44 pm

I guess keeping the valves in their holders was part of the problem, the other issue would be stopping the electrodes being shaken to bits 8))

 
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Re: Valves for military use

Post by Michael Watterson » Mon Oct 15, 2012 9:09 pm

Telefunken had some very stable low profile metal can valves

 
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Re: Valves for military use

Post by Andrewausfa » Mon Oct 15, 2012 10:22 pm

ppppenguin wrote:
Andrewausfa wrote:Funnily enough at a wedding last month I was talking to a chap who was a radio op on HMS something or other (HMS Compass Rose? Marlborough?).


Methink's you've been reading too much Nicholas Monserrat. HMS Compass Rose was the fictitious corvette in "The Cruel Sea". I think HMS Marlborough was a fictitious ship in one of his other books.


I know Jeffrey, which is why I wrote it! :D "HMS Marlborough Will Enter Harbour" is where the other ship comes from.

Andrew

 
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Re: Valves for military use

Post by Andrewausfa » Tue Oct 16, 2012 1:36 pm

That's the one, radios dead, guns out of action etc etc. One of my favourite authors except for 'The Nylon Pirates'. HMS 'Marlborough' has actually been used on a RN vessel recently I seem to recall, maybe mid' 90s.

Andrew

 

Re: Valves for military use

Post by XTC » Sat Nov 24, 2012 2:46 pm

As far as I know, there was nothing specially rugged about the general run of valves used by the military in WWII.

It was after the war that Brimar etc started to produced special quality ruggedised valves with specially thick mica spacers and extra care taken over degassing and evacuation. If you look at the CV lists, there are often SQ and standard versions of a particular valve, say, EF91, so I don't believe the military always insisted on, (and paid extra for), ruggedised valves and used them indiscriminately.


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