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1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

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1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by Jamie » Thu Mar 24, 2016 5:32 pm

Got my latest dangerous appliance today, Short trip up to Lowestoft. It was on eBay for £5 but I paid £25 as a buy it not as I didn't want anyone else to get it...

I have personally never seen one this old before. 70s ovens come up all the time but one that's pre-war! Anyway, We managed to man handle it into the boot of the Granada with the seats down, The vendor was a woman who owned a company which re-manufactured victorian engines, plus moden windfarm turbines etc and she said it was in use 25 years ago so did work.

I got it back to the workshop, and boy oh boy words cannot express how heavy this really is. The steel is an inch thick, add to that the enamel on top! I managed to drag it out of the boot, and because I was by myself dragged it along the soggy grass outside the workshop, up the steps and managed to wobble it towards it's hole in the workshop. No damage done of course, because of it's solid structure. The cooker is in good condition, the enamel has rusted in places but is to be expected. I intend to touch up the black parts with stove paint and maybe clear cote the rusty bits of enamel if I can find a clear coat that is heat resistant. It's even got a temeprature gauge, probably full of mercury! :aah The switches are a nice chunky bakelite switch, with a giant spring inside so you can flick it to the setting you want proper quality.

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The brilliant part about this cooker is everything comes apart for easy cleaning, every panel, even the heating elements are all plugged in with very large plugs. So I can remove everything without damaging it to clean, and test the elements out of circuit.
The wiring is all large plated strips of metal and braided wiring so is all good condition, although it does need a new earth strip.

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Each circuit is protected by a nice chunky ceramic fuseholder and 15A fuse wire.

More to come, once i've cleaned it. I've got to work out how im going to test it too... May be able to connect it directly to my 16A feed using suitable wire and test one element at a time so I don't draw more than 16A as this unit is 5000W so a lot of amps!

 
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Re: 1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by PYE625 » Thu Mar 24, 2016 8:17 pm

Very nice example of something made to last :qq1

Looking forward to a Sunday roast dinner cooked in the workshop mmmm

 
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Re: 1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by Refugee » Fri Mar 25, 2016 5:22 pm

Do be very careful with all that asbestos insulated wiring.
It looks like an early post war cooker to me.

 
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Re: 1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by Jamie » Fri Mar 25, 2016 9:29 pm

Hi, It's not asbestos.

 
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Re: 1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by Herald1360 » Sat Mar 26, 2016 12:26 am

If the thermometer line is silvery, it's mercury- I expect it will be, alcohol is no good for cooker temperatures, it boils at about 70C.

If it ain't broke, no problem. Even if it is, there's not a lot to worry about.

 
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Re: 1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by Katie Bush » Sat Mar 26, 2016 1:31 am

A wonderful "Hotpoint" product, by British Thomson-Houston.. These were typical of the cookers installed in council houses, in days gone by, and were simple in design, easy access for the council sparky (oh yes, they did once have their own!) to work on, and everything was what we'd call these days, "plug 'n' play".

It would originally have been connected via a T&E "cooker cable" to a huge (by today's standards) cast iron "cooker switch" on the kitchen wall - worth looking out for one of those, if you can find one (especially if you can get a British Thomson-Houston original item).. The switch box would also likely have been fitted with a 15A round pin socket, ideal for that Swan, Best, Hotpoint, or whatever you have, electric kettle!

Be careful when handling the cooker top, and various other cast iron parts - they don't take kindly to being dropped or toppled over (if leant against a wall etc.), and whereas you could replace them quite easily, back in the day, you'll have a swine of a job to find the parts now!

If the enamel has been lifted by rust, be vary careful of the razor sharp edges on the chipped enamel - it can slit your finger before you're even aware it's happened.

Marion

 
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Re: 1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by Paul_RK » Sat Mar 26, 2016 2:04 pm

Excellent find! I'm harbouring a couple of mid-1930s cookers, both Revo, and a mid-'50s GEC which may yet get to take over household duties from the current early '60s Belling. This one does have a very early post-war look about it, a few years later and its construction would have been much lighter.

Paul

 
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Re: 1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by Peter88gate » Sun Mar 27, 2016 12:05 am

Amazing how similar the construction of the Hotpoint cooker is to the Revo that my family owned from the late 1940s until about 1984. I commented about Paul's Revo (shown in a picture recently on the UKVRR forum) and how similar it was to the one owned by my family.

Peter

 
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Re: 1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by Jamie » Sun Mar 27, 2016 8:48 pm

Boohoo! No fire, sparks, burning or anything! I found some chunky 13A cable and hooker her up today after a deep clean, and some obvious basic checks.

The RCD didn't trip, I first switched on the oven. All four elements work and the oven draws 1300W at 240V.
I then switched it off, and tried the hotplate which draws 1600W.

And lastly, the grill which draws 900W however I note a few of the elements of the grill are dead, So will investigate those further.
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I'm even surprised the mercury thermometer works! Here you can see I warmed it up to 250 degrees farenheit as I didn't want to waste all of my electricity!
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Now for some more cleaning, a bit of safety prep and then I will start using it in the workshop for pasties etc. Mad to think though it's at least 70 years old if not older, and it works more or less as well as the day it was made.

 
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Re: 1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by Katie Bush » Sun Mar 27, 2016 9:35 pm

Hi Jamie,

Do check the continuity of those grill elements, and I personally would expect them to be OK.. That pattern of 'lit' and 'unlit' elements is far too symmetrical to just be a random failure.. Then check the grill control switch and wiring from there to the elements.. I'd bet on the fault lying there.

Marion

 
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Re: 1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by Jamie » Sun Mar 27, 2016 9:51 pm

That's a good point Marion, this was on "high" so I assumed they would all glow, however maybe medium switches a few on and low is even fewer maybe they do not all glow on high. Will check! :qq1

 
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Re: 1930s/1940s Hotpoint Electic Oven!

Post by Katie Bush » Sun Mar 27, 2016 10:25 pm

Hi Jamie,

Your surmise would be correct, and I'd expect the grill to run at something like; low = 400W, medium = 800W and high = 1600W (approximately), so 2 bars, 4 bars, and 8 bars, with each bar being approximately 200W.. That all assumes the bars are all the same Wattage, and it is just possible that some are different, however, from the picture, I'd assume all are equal.

It was not uncommon for switches to develop O/C contacts due to arcing whilst switching, or for the 'plug' connectors at the grill itself to go O/C as a result of arcing/burning, and/or ingress of spilt foodstuff.

Worth doing a little investigating because I'd reckon on being able to restore full function.

Marion


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