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Farewell to Neil

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Farewell to Neil

Post by CTV » Sat Aug 25, 2012 9:15 pm

Sad news that Neil Armstrong has departed for his next great adventure.

One of my earliest memories at the age of six was being plonked down in front of the TV, two watch him step into history.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-19381098

 
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Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by Refugee » Sat Aug 25, 2012 9:33 pm

That was one of the rare occasions we were allowed to stay up and watch telly at boarding school :thumbl:
What a shame.

 
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Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by sideband » Sat Aug 25, 2012 9:49 pm

Sad news indeed. He was a pioneer though and will always be remembered.

I watched the first moon landing on my newly repaired Ekco T283 in 1969 which would have made it about 13 years old at the time. I was 16 and it was my first TV repair. The line whistle was very loud and I sat up virtually all night watching history being made on that TV. Anything space was big news in those days and after that first historic event, we all believed that there would be moonbases by 2000. It was the year after 2001 A Space Odyssey was released which I had seen in London (Odeon Leicester Square) the first week it was released, made almost anything seem possible.......


Rich.

 
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Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by Michael Watterson » Sat Aug 25, 2012 9:57 pm

It's very sad.

The end of an era that started with optimism and has fizzled out. I had read Asimov, EE "doc" Smith, AC Clarke, Bradbury etc and sat up late watching that historic landing and first steps.

http://xkcd.com/893/

:(

 
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Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by CTV » Sat Aug 25, 2012 10:32 pm

sideband wrote:Anything space was big news in those days and after that first historic event, we all believed that there would be moonbases by 2000.
Rich.



Michael Watterson wrote:The end of an era that started with optimism and has fizzled out.


Indeed so very sad, and I wish we had continued. I fear we are moving backwards and quite possibly have peaked. We are now post Apollo, post Shuttle, post Concorde.

I know people will say oh but look at all the money it costs, we could have spent it on hospitals and eliminating poverty & famine. Yep we could, just like we could spend the billions to do that instead of fighting all the recent wars which makes the space program budget look like pocket money. I for one would gladly divert my taxes from bombs to space research.

But what about the frontiers, what about exploration what about the endeavors that join & unite humanity that test the very best of us and turn dreams into reality.

As Kennedy's speech rallied once before so it should again, different times agreed a cold war and a race but still a noble cause today as it was then as it should be now.

"We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too."

We need to continue this, we need to leave the cradle, we cannot let Neil's footprint and the few that followed be the only steps we take. Neither to let down those who paid the ultimate price in the quest , Apollo 1, Challenger & Columbia.

Rant over from the six year old child that once dreamed the dream :\'(

 

Neil Armstrong

Post by octal » Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:36 am

Most will probably be aware that Neil Armstrong passed away yesterday. My words could not pay tribute to a man of his significance so I will just say that what he did was a revelation to the young me, his footsteps will remain to the end of the solar system and may he RIP.
Last edited by CTV on Sun Aug 26, 2012 9:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Moved as we already had a thread running on the sad news

 
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Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by Katie Bush » Sun Aug 26, 2012 10:04 pm

Yes indeed...

I was really saddened by this news.. Neil Armstrong was a big figure in my mind, and in no small part, due to my school following the Apollo moon missions as though they were run by our headmaster..

I note that Neil's demise was a carbon copy of what happened to my dad, and at almost the same age.. It may sound perverse, but there was one small grain of comfort, for me, in knowing that with all the fantastic medical care and support in America, when it comes down to it, the end result is just the same..

I can still remember being allowed to watch Neil's first tentative step onto the lunar surface, and all the drama and tension in the air at the time.

Younger people may not know him as we older ones do, but I think he will be remembered the world over, as one of the great explorers of modern times..

Perhaps a fitting tribute would be to put his ashes on the moon's surface..

Goodbye Neil Armstrong, and farewell to a modern hero.....

 
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Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by GlowingAnode » Sun Aug 26, 2012 11:35 pm

A sad loss indeed, unfortunately I was not around to witness it.

Michael Watterson wrote:
The end of an era that started with optimism and has fizzled out.

:(


I am of the opinion the motivating factor was Cold War prestige, which disappeared with the collapse of the USSR.
Rob.

 
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Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by Panrock » Mon Aug 27, 2012 8:19 am

GlowingAnode wrote:I am of the opinion the motivating factor was Cold War prestige, which disappeared with the collapse of the USSR.
Rob.


I'd be inclined to agree. By that analysis, without the underpinning of all that military spending - there would never have been a space programme. Also, Wernher Von Braun and his 'V2' development experience came in useful to the Americans and the astronauts themselves often came from a test pilot background.

A wonderful event nevertheless. I was 19 at the time of the moon landing and remember jumping up and down in the loft with excitement, somehow unable to take on board that man was actually on the moon. As an amateur astronomer myself, I was particularly interested.

Despite this, I remember how the event was shrouded in 1960s cynicism even as it occurred, with dreary carping about 'how much it cost', the 'square' image of the clean-cut astronauts, and the contrived nature of Neil Armstrong's landing announcement. And of course, after another few landings the public actually got bored and the ratings plummeted. Can you credit it?

Looking back at it now, it seems like this was something amazingly ahead of its time, still very challenging today, yet achieved with 1960s technology and computing power.

R.I.P Neil. A job well done !

Steve

 

Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by octal » Mon Aug 27, 2012 9:40 am

The same economic moaning applied to any of mans major achievements of the time, Concorde for example and a little later the Chunnel. Both now seen with significant national pride, ironically.
In my estimation the Apollo missions and the moon landings are mans greatest ever achievement and transcends economic concern.

 
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Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by Brianc » Mon Aug 27, 2012 12:22 pm

I agree with you. In some ways, the cold war meant that at least some of the money which could have been spent on militarism was spent on pushing frontier back (not just the frontier of mass killing). Well done Neil. God Bless. Oh, and I second Katie's suggestion that his ashes go to the moon - although 'elf & safety might have something to say about that.

 
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Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by CTV » Mon Aug 27, 2012 12:34 pm

His ashes on the moon is a nice sentiment but I doubt one which he would have wanted or his family. Reading about him he was a quiet humble man which endeared him to many. He wished to be more than a monument. He shunned the publicity and potential fortune to be made, was happy to settle back in his teaching role after leaving NASA.

Personally I look forward to the Chinese going to the moon in the 20's which is not too far away. Perhaps it will rekindle mankind's quest again and no doubt make the Americans sit up and take notice.

 
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Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by Michael Watterson » Wed Sep 05, 2012 3:32 pm

GlowingAnode wrote:A sad loss indeed, unfortunately I was not around to witness it.

Michael Watterson wrote:
The end of an era that started with optimism and has fizzled out.

:(


I am of the opinion the motivating factor was Cold War prestige, which disappeared with the collapse of the USSR.
Rob.

Probably true.

 
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Re: Farewell to Neil

Post by peter scott » Sun Dec 28, 2014 1:05 pm

I hadn't realised that the Russians had created a Spacde Shuttle clone...

http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/russia ... ttle-clone


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