It is currently Sat Sep 23, 2017 1:37 pm

The last vinyl pressing plant in Australia...

For discussions about technology and people in technology.
 
Posts: 2714
Joined: Sun Sep 01, 2013 6:19 pm
Location: Behind the sofa

The last vinyl pressing plant in Australia...

Post by Cathovisor » Mon Oct 20, 2014 6:09 pm


 
Posts: 1931
Joined: Mon Jul 25, 2011 12:12 pm
Location: Burghfield, Reading, UK

Re: The last vinyl pressing plant in Australia...

Post by Brianc » Mon Oct 20, 2014 7:15 pm

They're actually using CDs as the masters! Doesn't this defeat the whole ethos of vinyl?

 
Posts: 2714
Joined: Sun Sep 01, 2013 6:19 pm
Location: Behind the sofa

Re: The last vinyl pressing plant in Australia...

Post by Cathovisor » Mon Oct 20, 2014 8:51 pm

Brianc wrote:They're actually using CDs as the masters! Doesn't this defeat the whole ethos of vinyl?

In some cases, yes. Unlikely to be of interest to some here, but the recent Black Sabbath album 13 caused a furore amongst some as the CD version was claimed to be inferior sonically to the vinyl pressing - over-compression seemed to be a primary complaint.

I think there was a token nod to the 'phool market there as I heard the mention of "180 gramme" pressings.

However... don't be surprised at the idea of all-analogue studios remaining; they are definitely out there - I was watching something only the other night on TV and was greeted by the unmistakable (to this poor sap, anyway) shape of a 24-track Studer A80 (I far preferred the A800). Equally, there are people who buy small analogue sound desks (e.g. Amek BCII/BCIII) as a "front end" to digital sound desks - to alter their sound.

 
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2014 5:02 pm

Re: The last vinyl pressing plant in Australia...

Post by jamesperrett » Fri Oct 31, 2014 2:25 pm

I could potentially do an all analogue recording here - but I don't think I've pressed the record button in anger on any of my analogue tape machines for over 10 years. Vinyl is still very much alive though - I do 2 or 3 vinyl pre-masters per year. Analogue processing is very common in recording and mastering studios although it is mainly used because of its perceived colouration of sound.


Return to Technology & People



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest